Collaboration

On a college course, we learn together. There is limited time to do this in the classroom, so to extend collaboration beyond the 4 walls and the limitations of the timetable presents a powerful opportunity. This is one of the key facets of a Virtual Learning Environment.
We shared research in a number of ways; I started by using Moodle to share useful links in forums (where they could be discussed), though I have subsequently got my head around delicious and will incorporate tagging in 07/08.

I made a start this year on usage of the Glossary - not to present information to students, but to get them to define it. I only used it for one activity - identifying features and examples of song structure. I will make more use of this (and wikis) in 07/08 for any common study terms - music language, arrangement and instrumentation characteristics (elsewhere in this wiki) style and genre, music business terminology.
Here's an example of an entry for the 'song structure' glossary.
Chorus: main theme, main lyrical idea, repetitive, hookiest part – the bit you wait for – culmination of the verse – the satisfaction. The ‘pay-off’ for the verse, and repeated often during the song.

Comments on "Chorus"

Add comment external image comment.gif

||
external image f2.jpg
by Peter Whitfield - Wednesday, 27 September 2006, 11:34 AM

Break on Through, by the Doors, has a good example of a chorus. The title of the song is repeated several times, with a simple, memorable vocal melody. This chorus is suddenly much more intense than the verse before it - the vocal is higher and louder, and the instruments all play fuller parts than in the verse, making the chorus stand out.
The chorus comes just 18" into the song and, unusually, lasts just 6 bars.

||
external image f2.jpg
by Fabien FERRYMAN - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:09 PM

in the song "come together" by the beatles the chorus is clearly heard because the whole song rises up the vocals get louder more instruments come in and theres a catchy hook

||
external image f2.jpg
by Stewart CAMPBELL - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:25 PM

the chorus to back in black is very strong becuase of the chord changes,the vocal phrasing also becomes
more traditional,following the almost rap like style of the verse.

||
external image f2.jpg
by Fabien FERRYMAN - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:28 PM

In the song "Purple haze" the verse is catchy and repetive as he repeats the title in it sevral times and this sounds more like a chorus,and there is no actual chorus as its basicaly a small instumental

||
external image f2.jpg
by Stewart CAMPBELL - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:28 PM

the chorus in whole lotta love is only really defined by the fact that the title of the song is being sung in this part.there aren`t really any dramatic changes going on in the music.

||
external image f2.jpg
by Siobhan TARBUCK - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:28 PM

In come together the lyrics "come together" mark the chourus it is the hookiest part. The line repeats throughout the song. The guitar also plays a more prominat role making it more catchy.

||
external image f2.jpg
by Ashley JONES - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:29 PM

Ironic - the chorus for ironic is very powerful and stands out definetely as the catch of the song as the instruments and vocals get very powerful which differs from the soft acoustic verse and gives it a kick

||
external image f2.jpg
by Fabien FERRYMAN - Wednesday, 4 October 2006, 03:33 PM

In the song "wonderful world" the chorus is only a bar long as louie armstrong says "as i think to myself what a wonderful world" and also the melody doesent change either so i think this song doesent fit the normal criteria.


On a Friday night, a student contributes a lesson idea!
external image f2.jpg
music in context lesson ideaby Ashley JONES - Friday, 15 June 2007, 08:50 PM

i remember micks lesson and it was good, but i felt it could have been better, i liked watchin the video on miles davis but thought that next year you could show these

http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/sevenages//

seven ages of rock, if you havent seen it , its been on bbc2 and documents basically most of the stuff we researched. surely you could download the episodes and burn them to dvd, might be illegal but who cares if its for educational purposes.

just an idea.

[[http://moodle.ccm.ac.uk/fe/mod/forum/post.php?reply=1641|]]

external image f2.jpg
Re: music in context lesson ideaby Peter Whitfield - Saturday, 16 June 2007, 05:26 AM

You are totally right Ash - the series is awesome and when it came out I thought it would be cool to get (at least) some of the interviews and background info on the web and sure enough (good old Beeb) the Seven Ages of rock web site was there and waiting. I have linked to this elsewhere in Moodle.
Wouldn't that just be the best website for learning about music - somewhere that had interviews and performances - there's loads of stuff in YouTube of course.
And a forum sharing career research.

Recordingby Peter Whitfield - Thursday, 14 September 2006, 05:49 PM

Identify and describe job roles in recording.
external image recording-setup.jpg

external image f2.jpg
Re: Recordingby Ollie SMITH - Monday, 25 September 2006, 02:24 PM

here's a bangin website that shows you the job description of a studio engineer. i never knew you could get an apprenticeship in this type of thing...
http://www.learndirect-advice.co.uk/helpwithyourcareer/jobprofiles/profiles/profile506/
there you go my lovlies.

external image f2.jpg
Re: Recordingby Ashley JONES - Monday, 2 October 2006, 01:43 PM

http://www.recordproduction.com/JOBS.HTM
that's mine. it's alreet.
gives you interview with record poducers, gives you sites to visit to buy equipment to aid you. latest news section, a job section and a forum to speak to other people who are interested in the same areas as you

external image studio-dog-crop-540-IMG_4354.jpg

external image f2.jpg
Re: Recordingby Jefferson TEMPLE - Monday, 2 October 2006, 01:42 PM

http://www.recordingconnection.com seems like an interesting site, i would consider something like a recording engeneering course to claim i was getting a 'real' job while i wrote some chowns, it looks predominantly U.S based but says somwhere that it now has links in the U.K

external image f2.jpg
Re: Recordingby Rhiannon HODGSON - Monday, 9 October 2006, 01:38 PM

i found this article about A&R jobs, its an interview with someone who works as an A&R person it gives info on how to get into that area of work and the good/bad sides of the job.
http://www.thesite.org/workandstudy/gettingajob/careersatoz/arscout

external image f2.jpg
Re: Recordingby Siobhan TARBUCK - Monday, 9 October 2006, 01:50 PM

This page on the bbc website is simular got interviews with a&r people so get their point of view of the job, best bits, worst bits skills for the job etc http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio1/onemusic/ar/

external image f2.jpg
Sample productionby Peter Whitfield - Tuesday, 31 October 2006, 12:37 PM

Lots of writers and producers use samples to make music. Sometimes these come from existing commercial recordings (and the copyright holder needs to give permission for the sample to be used), sometimes from sample libraries.
These libraries are generally enormous and expensive, and dominated by big production companies but there's a new venture being set up by Ilio in California called Samplebase . This is a scheme that allows individual or independent musicians to contribute a small library (for example, vocal riffs and phrases) that is sold by download from the website. Money comes in from sales - so the more popular your library the more you make.